paindecampagne

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Archive for the tag “friday photo”

Friday Photo: Morano Gelato, Hanover, New Hampshire

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These whipped cloud-like mounds of gelato display the dessert’s luxuriousness. July 2013.

Being the daughter of a dairy farmer, I have an incredible weakness for dairy products, especially ice cream. However, even I admit that once you taste gelato, like that of Morano Gelato in Hanover, New Hampshire, there’s no turning back.

According to the Morano website, gelato differs from American ice cream in three main ways: gelato has a lower butterfat content (4-9% verses 14-25%), is less dense than traditional ice cream (20-30% air verses 50%), and is served at 10-15 degrees warmer than traditional ice cream is. These qualities allow gelato to pack an incredibly rich, creamy mouthfeel, so decadent that only a few spoonfuls are endlessly satisfying. No triple-decker cone is needed here.

Called “the best gelato in America” by Forbes magazine, the gelato at Morano is made fresh daily and sells out every evening. Come early to try out flavors like Almond, English Custard, or Dark Chocolate — which was too rich for even me — or to sample classic Italian espressos and sandwiches amid the boutique’s chic décor and outdoor seating.

57 South Main Street
Hanover, New Hampshire

Friday-Saturday, 11:00am-10pm
Tuesday-Thursday & Sunday, 11:00am-9:30pm

Hours change seasonally.

http://www.moranogelato.com/

Friday Photo: May in Marseilles, France

Marseilles, May 2008

Interior, Notre Dame de la Garde, May 2008

Five years ago, I was traveling in Marseilles, France, after visiting my host mother in Avignon and returning to Talange, France, where I was to finish up my academic year as an English teaching assistant. These photographs were shot from the Basilique Notre Dame de la Garde, a church on the highest hill of Marseilles, about 162 meters above sea level. One photograph was taken inside the beautifully-painted chapel and the other, overlooking the city.

Overlooking Marseilles, May 2008

Overlooking Marseilles, May 2008

Free Pancake Friday, Oakland Avenue, Pittsburgh

Fresh pancakes, Oakland Ave, November 2012

“Pancakes! Get your free pancakes!”

The voice is loud and authoritative, and it cuts through the crisp morning like a fishmonger’s. Danny Santoro, a junior computer engineering major at Carnegie Mellon University, bends over two hot griddles on his front lawn, pouring scoopfuls of batter from industrial-sized mixing bins and waiting until the pancakes bubble and sizzle. Roommates Chad Miller and Adam Britton along with a handful of neighbors gather around, exhaling steam into the morning air. It’s week 11 of Free Pancake Friday on Oakland Ave.

“They’re free, like, for real? I just can’t wrap my mind around it,” says a passerby, leaning over the griddle and accepting a hotcake and a cup of hot chocolate. “I figured you were a bunch of boys doing a science experiment. Thank you so much!”

“Yeah, they’re free,” says Santoro. “No ulterior motive. Well, we have a tip jar.” He flips a few pancakes and then adds, almost as an extra thought, “For charity.”

Hot chocolate and morning joy, Oakland Ave, November 2012

Past charities have included the Pittsburgh Food Bank, breast cancer research, and Hurricane Sandy relief, but raising money was not the original point. Free Pancake Friday began first as a mistake.

“The first week happened because we were trying to have a house breakfast, and Chad made way too many pancakes,” Santoro explains. “So we just kind of stood out on the street and gave them out, no plates or anything. Hot and free, like America in the summertime.”

Today, they not only have plates; they have syrup, hot chocolate, a lawn table to lounge at, and pancakes whose flavors vary per week, ranging from pumpkin to buckwheat to red velvet. The group plans to keep making pancakes through the winter and through the snow. “Who doesn’t like pancakes?” Santoro says.

Danny Santoro, a CMU junior, mans the griddle; November 2012

Friday Photo: Toothpaste Mustard

Let’s assume that you don’t speak German, or at the very least, speak it fluently.  Then you would be as surprised as I was last week whenever I saw two brightly-colored tubes on my kitchen table and was told that they were not filled with toothpaste.  The mind spins:

“Süßer senf”: a phrase intended to help clear the nose of blockage during a cold?  “Mittelscharfer senf”: a relation to John Jacob Jingleheimer Schmidt?

No matter — a Google translator tells me one of these is a Bavarian sweet mustard; the other “medium-hot mustard.”

Just squeeze from the bottom up and don’t mistake your toothbrush for a hot dog.  What genius!

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